16 Facts Email Awareness Campaign: Days 4-6

Thousands of people receive the daily ‘16 Facts for 16 Days’ email from Women’s Aid which contains the latest national and international statistics on violence against women, messages of support for the campaign and women’s accounts of abuse.  Women’s Aid encourage recipients to forward the emails to friends, supporters, and members during the campaign.  If you’d like to get the 16 Facts for 16 Days email direct to your inbox sign up today – email 16days@womensaid.ie or phone 01-8684721.

Day 4: Domestic Violence and Minority Ethnic Women

In 2008, minority ethnic women represented nearly 20% of Women’s Aid Support Service users.

[Women’s Aid National Freephone Helpline and Support Services Annual Statistics 2008]

37% of women accessing and leaving refuge were Travellers, 6% black and 2% Asian. It is important not to draw conclusions about levels or severity of domestic violence amongst particular minority ethnic communities given some appear ‘over-represented’ in refuge provision. Instead it shows that minority women face additional barriers to obtaining long-term safety and lack other possible options than emergency accommodation.

[SAFE Ireland (2009) Safety & Change: A national study of support needs and outcomes for women accessing refuge provision in Ireland]

Minority ethnic women only comprise appr. 5% of Ireland’s population, but represented 13% of those seeking services from gender-based violence organisations. Traveller women make up 0.5% of population but represent 15% of service users.

[The Women’s Health Council (2009) Translating Pain Into Action: A study of Gender-based Violence and Minority Ethnic Women in Ireland.]

Barriers to fulfilling minority ethnic women’s needs identified by gender-based violence services and minority ethnic organisations were: inadequate resources, absence of staff training, and the Habitual Residence Condition. Most GBV organisations identified language and the absence of interpretation services as barriers.

The Women’s Health Council (2009) Translating Pain Into Action: A study of Gender-based Violence and Minority Ethnic Women in Ireland.]

Click here to see a message of support from Colm O’Gorman and read one woman’s story.

Day 5: Domestic Violence: A pattern, not an isolated event

Irish research found that 24% of women who had experienced domestic violence reported experiencing one form of violence, 25% had experienced two or three types of violence, 20% had experienced four to seven types of violence and 31% had experience eight or more types.

[Bradley, F, et al. (2002) Reported Frequency of Domestic Violence; Cross sectional survey of women attending general practice. British Medical Journal; Vol. 324]

Almost three quarters of incidents of domestic violence (73%) involve repeat offending, with over one in four victims (27%) attacked three or more times.

[Third Special Report: Domestic Violence, Forced Marriage and “Honour”-Based Violence, House of Commons Home Affairs Committee, 31st October 2008.]

Domestic violence has the highest rate of repeat victimisation of any type of crime. 42% of women disclosed being victimised more than once and almost 1 in 4 women (23%) reported being attacked 3 or more times.

[ 2000 British Crime Survey: England and Wales, Home Office]

Click here to see a message of support from An Garda Síochána and to read one woman’s story.

Day 6: Domestic Violence & Children

In 2008, there were 1,829 specific incidents of child abuse disclosed to the Women’s Aid National Freephone Helpline.  Abuse of children ranged from physical violence (pushing down stairs, attempted stabbing) to threatening to place the children in foster care and forcing children to eat off the floor.  In an additional 3,408 calls it was directly disclosed that children were living with domestic violence against their mother.

[Women’s Aid National Freephone Helpline and Support Services Annual Statistics 2008]

In 2003, 3 out of 4 women who were accommodated in refuge were accompanied by one or more children.

[National Crime Council and ESRI, Domestic Abuse of Women and Men in Ireland, 2005]

In the UK, nearly 75% of children on the ‘at risk’ register live in households where domestic violence occurs.

[UK Department of Health, 2002]

An overview of research studies found that in between 30-66% of cases, the same perpetrator is abusing both the mother and the children.

[Edleson, J., Children’s witnessing of adult domestic violence, Journal of Interpersonal Violence,  vol. 14.  839-870, 1999]

Click here to see a message of support from Fergus Finlay and to read about one child’s experience of domestic violence.

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