Web Women’s Group remember murdered women

Web Women’s Group will be releasing 159 balloons on the steps of the Holy Redeemer Church, Main St. Bray, Co. Wicklow on Human Rights Day, Thursday 10th December at mid day. One minutes silence will be held to remember the 159 women murdered in Ireland since 1996. The event will be launched by Paddy Cole, one of Ireland’s most respected musicians and everyone is invited to come along, release a balloon and join the group for tea and coffee after the event.

Further information is available form ellyfairbairn@hotmail.com

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2 Comments

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2 responses to “Web Women’s Group remember murdered women

  1. Maura Ryan

    This event went straight to my heart as I saw all the people on the steps of the church and the soft pink and white balloons we held suspended high above our heads, waiting to e let loose. Paddy Cole spoke about how a most of these women were killed by their partners or husbands and about domestic violence in Ireland.
    During a minutes silence I thought of these women and their murderers and I visualised a white healing light around them all and their children and relatives. It was what came to mind during that silence…peace and healing..not violence. As we released our “prayer” balloons up high into the sunny blue sky there was an uplifting cry from the crowd and with heads held high we gazed at them floating with strings wriggleing as they danced their way higher and higher, until they were tiny dots in the blue heavens.

  2. Maura Ryan

    This event felt empowering and uplifting. Even thought I’m both angry and saddened by all the murdered women we were remembering, there was a sense of solidarity and strength to be ‘speaking out’ together in public. Paddy Cole spoke of how most of the women were killed by husbands and partners, and of domestic violence. We held one minutes silence and then released 159 balloons into the sunny blue sky above. I call them “prayer” balloons as I know everyone had their own thoughts during our silence. I think it was a very important public event and it brought people together then, and after when some of us went for tea and a chat in The Little Flower Hall and shared our stories.

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