Tag Archives: 16 Facts for 16 Days

16 Facts for 16 Days – Days 10-12

Day 10: Domestic Violence and the legal system

Only 29% of women who had experienced severe abuse had reported it to An Garda Síochána.

[National Crime Council and ESRI, Domestic Abuse of Women and Men in Ireland, 2005]

In 2008, there were 10,401 applications for protective orders under the Domestic Violence Act (1996).  3,096 barring orders were applied for and 1,251 were granted. In the same year 1,502 Safety Orders were granted, 617 were refused and 1,209 struck out/withdrawn. 2,955 protection orders were granted whilst 256 were refused and 138 struck out/withdrawn.

[Central Statistics Office (2009) Court Services Statistics for 2008]

There were 1,184 incidents of Breaching Domestic Violence Orders Offences in 2006. This resulted in 349 convictions.  95% of persons convicted were male. 

[Central Statistics Office (2008) Garda Recorded Crime Statistics 2003-2006]

National research carried out in 1999 found that between 1% and 6% of domestic violence offenders in Ireland receive a prison sentence.

[Kelleher & O’Connor, Safety and Sanctions, Women’s Aid, 1999]

Click here for a message of support from Senator Ivana Bacik and to read Karen’s story.

Day 11: Obstacles to Leaving

Almost a fifth (18%) of callers to the Women’s Aid National Freephone Helpline in 2008 disclosed that they were abused by an ex-spouse or partner.  The types of abuse disclosed after the relationship has ended included: physical and sexual assaults, stalking, publicly humiliating the woman, and damage to her new home and property.

[Women’s Aid National Freephone Helpline & Support Services Annual Statistics 2008]

In 2008, women could not be accommodated at refuge on more than 1,722 recorded occasions..

[SAFE Ireland (2009) 2008 Annual Statistics]

In Making the Links, the single biggest reason why women did not leave violent partners was having nowhere to go (88%). 44% of women cited fear of further violence as their reason for not leaving.

[O’Connor, M, & Kelleher Associates, Making the Links, Women’s Aid, 1995]

30% of victims who disclosed being severely abused said that the abuse continued after the relationship had ended.

[National Crime Council & ESRI (2005) Domestic Abuse of Women and Men in Ireland]

Click here for a message of support from Sharon O’Halloran and to read Geraldine’s story.

Day 12: Trafficking & Sexual Exploitation

Between January 2007 and September 2008, 102 women were identified by ten services as being trafficked into or through Ireland. These women were aware of a further 64 women who were trafficked into Ireland.  None of the 102 women knew they were specifically being recruited for the sex industry.

[Kelleher Associates (2009) Globalisation, Sex Trafficking and Prostitution: The Experiences of Migrant  Women in Ireland, Dublin: Immigrant Council of Ireland.]

Approximately 800,000 people are trafficked across national borders. Approximately 80% of these people are women and girls and up to 50% are minors.  The majority of these women and girls are trafficked into commercial sexual exploitation.

[Trafficking in Persons Report, Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, US Department of State, June 2007]

The annual global profits made from human trafficking for forced commercial sexual exploitation are estimated at US$27.8billion.

[Forced Labour and Human Trafficking: Estimating the Profits Working Paper, ILO, Geneva, 2005]

1 in 15 men in Ireland reported that they buy sex. 25% of men who bought sex stated that they had met a woman who they felt was being forced into prostitution.

[Layte et al (2006) The Irish Study of Sexual Health & Relationships, Dublin: Crisis Pregnaqncy Agency & Department of Health & Children; Escort Surveys  (2006) Irish Escort Client Surveys]

In a study of 30 women engaged in street prostitution in Dublin, 80% had been attacked while working in prostitution. Of these, nearly half (48%) had been assaulted by a partner.

[Haughey & Bacik (2000) Final Report: A Study of Prostitution in Dublin, Law School, Trinity College Dublin]

Click here for a message of support from Denise Charlton and to read Tatyana’s story.

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16 Facts for 16 Days – Days 7-9

Day 7: Domestic Violence and Health/Pregnancy

Women who have experienced domestic violence are at an increased risk of depression and suicide attempts; physical injuries; psychosomatic disorders; unwanted pregnancies; HIV and other STDs; being killed by a partner.

[World Health Organisation, World Report on Violence and Health, 2002]

International research shows that 25% of women who experience domestic violence are physically assaulted for the first time during pregnancy.

[[RCM (2006) Royal College of Midwives UK Domestic Abuse: A Position Paper]

5% of women in Ireland who experienced severe abuse in an intimate relationship suffered a miscarriage as a result of the abuse.

[National Crime Council and ESRI, Domestic Abuse of Women and Men in Ireland, 2005]

A study conducted by the Rotunda Maternity Hospital found that in a sample of 400 pregnant women, 1 in 8 had experienced abuse while they were pregnant.

[O’Donnell S, Fitzpatrick John M, McKenna PF, Abuse in Pregnancy – The Experience of Women, Nov 2000, Vol.98, No. 8]

Click here to see a message of support from Sam Coulter Smith and to read Aoife’s story.

Day 8: Domestic Violence & Injury

In 2008, there were 3,355 incidents of physical abuse disclosed to the Women’s Aid National Freephone Helpline. Reported physical abuse included being gagged and beaten; held down and choked to the point of unconsciousness; severely bitten; having chunks of hair fall out after being pulled around by it; and attempts at setting the woman on fire.

[Women’s Aid National Helpline and Support Services Annual Statistics Report 2008]

49% of women injured by their partner’s violence required medical treatment and 10% required a hospital stay.

[National Crime Council and ESRI, Domestic Abuse of Women and Men in Ireland, 2005]

Irish research found that of women who had experienced violent behaviour, 46% had been injured. Serious violent incidents were common, 10% of women were punched in the face; 10% punched or kicked on the body, arms, or legs; 9% choked; and 9% forced to have sex.

[Bradley, F, et al. (2002) Reported Frequency of Domestic Violence; Cross sectional survey of women attending general practice. British Medical Journal; Vol. 324]

For women aged 15-44 worldwide, acts of violence cause more death and disability than cancer, malaria, traffic accidents, and war combined.

[WHO (1997) Violence Against Women: A Priority Health Issue]

Click here to see a message of support from Sonya Lennon and to read Fiona’s story.

Day 9: The Economic Cost of Domestic Violence

The estimated economic cost of domestic violence to the Irish economy is €2.2billion a year. This is based on the Council of Europe (COE) figure that domestic violence costs each member state €555 per citizen (amounting to a total cost of €33 billion for the whole COE) annually in policing, health bills, lost productivity and court procedures.

[Ahern, TD, Dermot, Minister for Justice, speaking at the International Conference on Domestic Violence, Waterford, May 2008, quoted in ‘Domestic Violence costs the country €2.2bn’, The Irish Examiner, 30.5.08]

In Northern Ireland, £180,000,000 is the estimated total annual cost of domestic violence.

[Joint NIO/DHSSPS Strategy (2005) Tackling Violence at Home]

In Australia, it is estimated that if domestic violence against women was eliminated, potential costs savings of $207 million in the health sector and $1,801 million in production and leisure costs could be realised over time.

[Cadilhac, DA et al (2009) The health and economic benefits of reducing disease factors, Deakin University]

Click here to see a message of support from Claire Byrne and to read the specific costs of domestic violence in the UK.

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16 Facts Email Awareness Campaign: Days 4-6

Thousands of people receive the daily ‘16 Facts for 16 Days’ email from Women’s Aid which contains the latest national and international statistics on violence against women, messages of support for the campaign and women’s accounts of abuse.  Women’s Aid encourage recipients to forward the emails to friends, supporters, and members during the campaign.  If you’d like to get the 16 Facts for 16 Days email direct to your inbox sign up today – email 16days@womensaid.ie or phone 01-8684721.

Day 4: Domestic Violence and Minority Ethnic Women

In 2008, minority ethnic women represented nearly 20% of Women’s Aid Support Service users.

[Women’s Aid National Freephone Helpline and Support Services Annual Statistics 2008]

37% of women accessing and leaving refuge were Travellers, 6% black and 2% Asian. It is important not to draw conclusions about levels or severity of domestic violence amongst particular minority ethnic communities given some appear ‘over-represented’ in refuge provision. Instead it shows that minority women face additional barriers to obtaining long-term safety and lack other possible options than emergency accommodation.

[SAFE Ireland (2009) Safety & Change: A national study of support needs and outcomes for women accessing refuge provision in Ireland]

Minority ethnic women only comprise appr. 5% of Ireland’s population, but represented 13% of those seeking services from gender-based violence organisations. Traveller women make up 0.5% of population but represent 15% of service users.

[The Women’s Health Council (2009) Translating Pain Into Action: A study of Gender-based Violence and Minority Ethnic Women in Ireland.]

Barriers to fulfilling minority ethnic women’s needs identified by gender-based violence services and minority ethnic organisations were: inadequate resources, absence of staff training, and the Habitual Residence Condition. Most GBV organisations identified language and the absence of interpretation services as barriers.

The Women’s Health Council (2009) Translating Pain Into Action: A study of Gender-based Violence and Minority Ethnic Women in Ireland.]

Click here to see a message of support from Colm O’Gorman and read one woman’s story.

Day 5: Domestic Violence: A pattern, not an isolated event

Irish research found that 24% of women who had experienced domestic violence reported experiencing one form of violence, 25% had experienced two or three types of violence, 20% had experienced four to seven types of violence and 31% had experience eight or more types.

[Bradley, F, et al. (2002) Reported Frequency of Domestic Violence; Cross sectional survey of women attending general practice. British Medical Journal; Vol. 324]

Almost three quarters of incidents of domestic violence (73%) involve repeat offending, with over one in four victims (27%) attacked three or more times.

[Third Special Report: Domestic Violence, Forced Marriage and “Honour”-Based Violence, House of Commons Home Affairs Committee, 31st October 2008.]

Domestic violence has the highest rate of repeat victimisation of any type of crime. 42% of women disclosed being victimised more than once and almost 1 in 4 women (23%) reported being attacked 3 or more times.

[ 2000 British Crime Survey: England and Wales, Home Office]

Click here to see a message of support from An Garda Síochána and to read one woman’s story.

Day 6: Domestic Violence & Children

In 2008, there were 1,829 specific incidents of child abuse disclosed to the Women’s Aid National Freephone Helpline.  Abuse of children ranged from physical violence (pushing down stairs, attempted stabbing) to threatening to place the children in foster care and forcing children to eat off the floor.  In an additional 3,408 calls it was directly disclosed that children were living with domestic violence against their mother.

[Women’s Aid National Freephone Helpline and Support Services Annual Statistics 2008]

In 2003, 3 out of 4 women who were accommodated in refuge were accompanied by one or more children.

[National Crime Council and ESRI, Domestic Abuse of Women and Men in Ireland, 2005]

In the UK, nearly 75% of children on the ‘at risk’ register live in households where domestic violence occurs.

[UK Department of Health, 2002]

An overview of research studies found that in between 30-66% of cases, the same perpetrator is abusing both the mother and the children.

[Edleson, J., Children’s witnessing of adult domestic violence, Journal of Interpersonal Violence,  vol. 14.  839-870, 1999]

Click here to see a message of support from Fergus Finlay and to read about one child’s experience of domestic violence.

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Women’s Aid 16 Facts for 16 Days Email Awareness Campaign, Day 1-3

Thousands of people receive the daily ‘16 Facts for 16 Days’ email from Women’s Aid which contains the latest national and international statistics on violence against women, messages of support for the campaign and women’s accounts of abuse.  Women’s Aid encourage recepients to forward the emails to friends, supporters, and members during the campaign.  If you’d like to get the 16 Facts for 16 Days email direct to your inbox sign up today – email 16days@womensaid.ie or phone 01-8684721.

Day 1: Wednesday 25th November 2009 (UN Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women)

Prevalence of Violence against Women in Ireland

1 in 5 of Irish women who have been in a relationship have been abused by a current or former partner. [O’Connor, M, & Kelleher Associates (1995) Making the Links, Women’s Aid]

In 2008, there were 15,158 incidents of domestic violence disclosed to the Women’s Aid National Freephone Helpline made up of 9,101 incidents of emotional abuse, 3,355 incidents of physical abuse, 1,900 incidents of financial abuse and 802 incidents of sexual abuse, including281 rapes within relationships. [Women’s Aid National Freephone Helpline & Support Services Annual Statistics 2008]

In a one-day survey on 4th November 2008, 263 women and 216 children were accommodated and/or received support from a domestic violence service; 239 helpline calls were received from women; 17 women and 15 children were admitted to refuge; 6 women could not be accommodated due to lack of space. [SAFE IRELAND (2009) ‘On the 4th November 2008’: A national one day count of women and children accessing Safe Ireland domestic violence services]

1 in 7 women in Ireland have experienced severe abuse, defined as ‘a pattern of physical, emotional or sexual behaviours between partners in an intimate relationship that causes, or risks causing, significant negative consequences for the person affected’. [National Crime Council and ESRI (2005)Domestic Abuse of Women and Men in Ireland]

On average, the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) responds to a domestic incident every 23 minutes of every day. [Northern IrelandPolice Board (2009) Thematic Inquiry: Domestic Abuse]

Click here for a message of support from Rebecca Miller and to read some of one woman’s first-hand account of domestic violence in Ireland.

Day 2: Thursday 26th November 2009

Violence against Women Globally

International research consistently demonstrates that a woman is more likely to be assaulted, injured, raped, or killed by a current or former partner than by any other person. Findings from nearly 80 population-bases studies indicate that between 10% and 60% of women who have ever been partnered have experienced at least one incident of physical violence from a current or former partner. [Ellsberg & Heise, 2005, WHO Multi-country Study on women’s health and domestic violence]

25% of all violent crimes reported involve a man assaulting his wife or partner. [EU Campaign Against Domestic Violence, 2000]

At least 1 in 3 women, or up to one billion women, have been beaten, coerced into sex, or otherwise abused in their lifetimes. Usually, the abuser is a member of her own family or someone known to her. [Heise, L, Ellsberg, M, Ending Violence against Women, 1999]

An estimated 150 million girls under 18 experienced some form of sexual violence in the year 2002 alone. [According to the WHO based on Ezzati et al (2004) Comparative Quantification of Health Risks: Global & Regional Burden of Disease Attributable to Selected Major Risk Factors]

Click here to see a message of support from Mary Robinson and to read three women’s stories from around the world.

Day 3: Friday 27th November 2009

Sexual Violence against Women

The Dublin Rape Crisis Centre carried out 9,487 counselling calls in 2008.  86% of callers were female. Trained volunteers at the Dublin Rape Crisis Centre attended the Sexual Assault Treatment Unit with 284 victims in 2008.  [DublinRape Crisis Centre (DRCC) Annual Report 2008]

Callers to the Women’s Aid National Freephone Helpline in 2008 disclosed 802 incidents of sexual abuse including 281 incidents of rape. (However, there has only been one successful conviction under the law criminalising rape within marriage since its induction in 1990.) [Women’s Aid National Freephone Helpline & Support Services Annual Statistics 2008]

8% of women in Ireland have experienced severe sexual abuse in intimate relationships. [National Crime Council and ESRI (2005) Domestic Abuse of Women and Men in Ireland]

Almost one quarter (23.6%) of perpetrators of sexual violence against women as adults are intimate partners or ex-partners. [McGee H et al (2002) SAVI: Sexual Abuse and Violence in Ireland, The Liffey Press in Association with Dublin Rape Crisis Centre]

More than 4 in 10 (42%) women in Ireland have experienced some form of sexual abuse or assault in their lifetime. [McGee H et al (2002) SAVI: Sexual Abuse and Violence in Ireland, The Liffey Press in Association with Dublin Rape Crisis Centre]

Click here to see a message of support from Ruth Gilligan, author and to read one woman’s account of her own experience.

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